Narbona Tigre: Tranquility Maintained

Usually when one gets to know a city for the first time, they look at a map, find something that says “old quarter,” find a museum to go to and then circumnavigate, find a plaza or port to explore and have a sitting-down cigarette and a coffee/beer in. Perhaps a cobblestoned shopping street to stroll down. One looks up at architecture, down at people’s faces and gradually soaks in the essence of the place. I kind of feel bad for my parents, because I think while they were looking forward to doing this in BsAs when they visited me here last week, what they got instead was a frantic food tour of each barrio. That is to say, we went to La Boca for pizza, Palermo for milanesa, San Telmo for picadas, Recoleta for asado, the parks for choripans. In a similar fashion, our trip to Tigre was FOR Narbona. I had an amazing experience at the original one in Carmelo and I wanted to share it with my parents without actually going to Carmelo. Luckily Narbona has a branch in Tigre, one hour away por train from BsAs.

Located on a modern boardwalk outstretch filled with other stores and restos, Narbona sits humbly offering up its goods: homemade yoghurt, cheese, bread, pasta, wine from the vineyard in Uruguay, a country only a short boat ride away. The walls are lined with cylindrical cartons of home-made dulce de leche, baskets of bread made that morning, and wine…lots of it. When we got there, the place was casi-closed, only offering coffee with dessert (teatime). It only took a few kind sentences about the obsession I have with their products and my desire to share it with my parents to convince the waitress to serve us some of their Viognier with a bit of their wonderful cheeses.


She brought us a whole plate full – soft and delicious camambert, dambo de corte with whole pepper grains, spiced logs of provolone, melty colonia – with a bit of their home-made bread and some fresh chive-herbed cream cheese to spread over it. It was small (nothing cooked as the kitchen was closed), but it was perfect. A plate full of their famed cheeses and fresh bread with a chilled bottle of white midday on a hot summer day. It was a miniature version of what I experienced before and exactly what I wanted to show my parents: tranquility, simplicity, kindness, and a careful attention to quality.

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3 thoughts on “Narbona Tigre: Tranquility Maintained

  1. Hola, a friend of mine, one of my best ones, who was once your English student in BsAs, recommended me to have a look at your blog. His name is Emilio Iraola. I have a food blog as well, except that I only post the dishes that I make myself. He suggested to have a look at your blog and learn something, espcially how to take pictures. That bastard thinks that I am bad in everything. Anyway, while reading your article I was drifted in reminiscence of the old time that I spent in BsAs. You take pictures very well and your narration also was pleasing. Btw, I live in Finland. Here the food culture is scarce so I started cooking myself and it turned out to be one of my greatest passion. Check it out if you wish on http://www.facebook.com/FoodsToDieFor and leave me some comment on how to take close up pictures. Enjoy your stay in BsAs! I practically grew up in Argentina and I really miss those days!

  2. Hola, a friend of mine, one of my best ones, who was once your Eglish student in BsAs, recommended me to have a look at your blog. His name is Emilio Iraola. I keep a food blog as well except that I only post the dishes that I make myself. Emilio says that I should learn from you, especially how to take pictures. That bastard thinks that I am bad in everything. While I was reading some of your articles I was drifted in reminiscence of old days I spent in BsAs. How good those days were! You take pictures very well and your narration is pleasing as well. Btw, I live in Oulu, Finland. Here the food culture is scarce and underdeveloped. So I started cooking myself, and it turned out to be one of my greatest passion. Check it out if you are interested on http://www.facebook.com/FoodsToDieFor and you can leave some comment on how to take closeup pictures. Enjoy your stay in BsAs! I practically grew up in Argentina and I really miss those days. 🙂

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